Supers, Swarms & Settling in!

I visited the bees on Tuesday with the view to finding out if they’d made any honey from the Oil Seed Rape close by. To my delight, Rebecca in Hive 2, Claire in Hive 4 and Hope in Hive 5 had a full super each. I put on clearing boards and intended to return the following day to remove them. I didn’t do a full inspection because I thought, what’s the point if I don’t have any more equipment. If they’re going to swarm then they’ll just have to get on with it. I did take a video tour of the apiary which I’ll post up separately when I can remember how the technology works! It was quite a chilled visit with time to sit and enjoy the bees!

Driving back yesterday to pick up the hopefully cleared supers, I noticed a lot of bee activity along the fence. Yip, one of the hives had swarmed! It was attached to the fence post but also to a low lying branch next to the fence. At this time of year, I always carry a bee box for such eventualities so I was able to brush the bees from the post into the box and then shake in the large cluster on the branch. I wedged my bee brush into the box to keep the lid slightly open and was delighted to see the bees on the outside of the box march in. I had definitely got the queen!

I then went and attended to the cleared supers, leaving the box open to allow any remaining bees from the swarm to realise the queen was in the box and follow suit. I got the supers off without too much bother and then picked up the box with the swarm and brought them home.

Now to find a home for the swarm. With all my equipment used up, I was going to have to give them away. I had mixed feeling about this. It’s a shame to loose such a big, vibrant colony but I just couldn’t keep them. Thinking positively, swarming is how bees naturally reproduce, so giving them away allows the gene pool to diversify and gives another beekeeper a chance to raise them. Fortunately, Graeme was keen to take them as one of his hives was queenless and dwindling. The bees stayed overnight in the back garden covered with a blanket and then it was off to hive them today.

The bees were find overnight and I took them to Graeme’s apiary this morning. It’s alway slight never racking transporting potentially 20,000-30,000 bees in a box, especially when they’re all not actually in the box – but it went fine. We tipped them into a new hive box and the existing queenless bees were merged with the icing sugar and newspaper technique. It was good to watch them settling in and doing orientation flights. I felt happy leaving them on such a nice apiary site and I’m sure they’ll do well.

I then returned to my apiary to put the empty supers back on the three hives I had removed them from. That was all I was going to do but my curiosity got the better of me and I wanted to know who had swarmed!

Caitlin in Hive 1 – the queen was seen and I tore down some queen cells.

Rebecca in Hive 2 – no queen seen, loads of queen cells and fewer bees. This is where I think the swarm has come from.

Sam in Hive 3  – no queen seen but no queen cells either so can’t have swarmed.

Claire in Hive 4 – blue queen seen, no queen cells, eggs seen. The artificial swarm must have worked.

Hope in Hive 5 – Didn’t open as they should still be raising a queen and I didn’t want to disturb.

Susan in Hive 6 – Queen seen, tore down some queen cells.

Hive 7 & 8 – Like Hope, I didn’t open as they should be raising a queen and I didn’t want to disturb them.

So, I’m pretty sure it was Rebecca in Hive 2 that swarmed. With having to tear down some queen cells in Caitlin in Hive 1 and Susan in Hive 6, they have the potential to swarm too. It’s been a pretty interesting few days if slightly intense!

The observant amounts you will realise that I’ve taken off supers.  Yes, I spent Wednesday afternoon and evening spinning honey. I’m assuming it’s Oil Seed Rape and it’s currently in the settling tank. I’m awaiting jars to be delivered and then I’ll do the usual FB post if anyone is interested. It tastes good!

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