Special Delivery!

Having been concerned that Hive Caitlin’s inconsistent brood pattern was caused by either a failing queen or a laying worker, I decided to re-queen this hive.  The new queen arrived today by Royal Mail Special Delivery!

Stuart and I went through Hive Caitlin, found and killed the old queen and placed the new queen, still in her box, in the middle of the hive.  I felt bad killing the old queen but it’s quite common practice.  I had no idea how old she was so replacing her will provide the hive with a new, young queen with a tested laying pattern.  She is currently in a box plugged with fondant icing and some worker attendants.  The attendants will eat through the fondant and, by the time they have done that, the hive should be used to her pheromones and accept her as their queen.  Fingers crossed!

 

We then inspected Hive Rebecca.  Since the last post about the Snelgrove manipulation, there have been various doors opened and closed with the view to keeping the existing queen in the bottom box and creating a new queen in the top box.  Well, that was the plan! On today’s inspection there was a big, bold, capped queen cell in the bottom box.  This means the bottom box must have swarmed and left a new queen.  Precisely what the Snelgrove manipulation was supposed to stop!  So now I have to wait a minimum of 15 days to see if this queen emerges safely and gets mated.  The supers were looking pretty full, probably one of the reasons they swarmed, so we’ve put on a clearing board and will take one off tomorrow.

Meanwhile, the top box had 3 empty queen cells.  Hopefully a good sign that a queen has emerged and is on her mating flights.  There were no signs of eggs yet!

The nucs have now officially been named Hive Susan and Hive Claire.  We had a quick look in Hive Claire and they’re drawing out the last frames in the box.  We’re going to put some supers on tomorrow and give them more space.

As if that wasn’t enough, before all our own inspections, I helped Sandy hive a swarm he’d caught in North Berwick.  He wanted me to watch out for the queen – not a job I’m renowned for having success with but my eyesight is better than his!  However, I did spot her, on the hive roof of all places, but when I picked her up a gust of wind blew and I thought she’d taken flight – disaster.  But, when I turned by hand round, she was still on my glove so I carefully put her at the entrance and watched her walk in.  The rest of the bees followed.  Amazing to watch.

So that’s 3 queens I’ve seen today.  One arrived by Royal Mail Special Delivery, one was dispatched to queen heaven and one was helped into her new home at Sandy’s apiary.

 

First inspection of Hive Caitlin

We managed to have a quick inspection of Hive Caitlin at the weekend when the sun was out and it was about 14 degrees.

The top super box had empty drawn comb. It looked old and probably needs discarding but  I’ll check with a beekeeper friend. We removed it as it didn’t seem be serving a purpose at the moment.

The next super was full of stored honey. The smell was devine but it’s for the bees so no stealing it!

And finally into the brood box. The comb on the outer edge was empty, black and had some dead, decomposing bees stuck to the bottom. Having never seen this before,I felt slightly worried but I continued to go through the frames and found some capped brood near the centre, then some larvae in various stages, and then some eggs. Yippee – the Queen is there and she’s laying. There aren’t as many bees as I was expecting but then I’ve never seen a hive re-establising itself coming out of winter! Although we never actually saw the Queen, we moved the queen excluder to in-between the brood box and the super with the stores. In all likelihood she was in the brood box and we’d like to container her down there. I forgot to take photos because I was concentration of finding the queen, brood and any signs of disease – a mistake because it’s always good to go back through the photos and take a second look. However, Stuart and I agreed that we hadn’t see any obvious signs of disease, other than a little chalk brood, and there was signs of laying, so hopefully all good!

I wanted to change the hive floor because, when in cluster, the bees are unable to remove the dead bodies from the natural winter bee wastage. Stuart lifted the hive and I removed the old floor and put in place a new wooden open mesh varroa floor. However I wasn’t expecting to see quite such a black, sludgy mess on the bottom of the old floor. This matched the strange black decomposing bees on the bottom of some of the frames. Having researched it, there was no need to worry. It’s all looked perfectly normal for decomposing dead bodies and the black dead bees on the frames had probably fallen out of the cluster and got stuck between the frames as they fell to the floor.

The last thing to do before closing the hive, was to dust the bees with icing sugar. This encourages them to groom themselves and, in the process, will increase the Varroa mite drop. I’ll go back in a week and see what the count is and then take appropriate action.

We brought the old floor and the top super home for cleaning and disinfecting. I’ll ask my beekeeper friend whether the top super frames and comb are too old to be reused. And finally, I’ve got lots of research to do to put together a plan for replacing the old frames and comb and moving forward into the summer.

Unfortunately we didn’t have time to inspect Hive Rebecca and the weather has turned again. I’ll need to do that as soon as the weather allows and put a plan in place for the summer.  IMG_3832